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Accidents and Incidents 7/26

Sat, Jul 26, 2008 — David Evans

Accidents & Incidents

ACCIDENTS & INCIDENTS

(20 July – 26 July 2008)

Airline, Corporate, & AeroMedevac

Date/

Location

Aircraft/Reg.

Narrative

Casualties

Comments

21 July

Dusseldorf, GERMANY

Air France-operated Airbus A320-100

Aircraft declared emergency and diverted to Dusseldorf after the right hand engine needed to be shut down in flight due to its exhaust gas temperature exceeding permitted limits.

Nonfatal

The jet landed safely. Air France sent a replacement aircraft to Dusseldorf to pick the passengers up and bring them to their destination.

21 July

Madison, WI

Northwest Airlines operated DC-9 jetliner

The jetliner made a safe emergency landing in Madison on Monday after the pilot reported a pressurization problem.

Nonfatal

Flight 126 with 115 passengers and a crew of six was flying from Minneapolis to O’Hare Airport in Chicago when the incident took place about 10:30 a.m., Northwest spokesman Vin Parker said. The plane was flying at 29,000 feet when the automatic pressurization system gave a reading for about 10,000 feet, he said. The flight was diverted to Dane County Regional Airport as a precaution, and no one was hurt.

21 July

Baton Rouge, LA

Atlantic Southeast Airlines (ASA) CRJ701ER (CL-600-2C10)

Reg: N706EV

Three Canadair CRJ planes were parked at the ASA maintenance facility at Baton Rouge. CRJ700 N706EV was supposed to be getting a compressor wash. When the right hand engine was done, the left engine was started. It reportedly spooled up to nearly full power. It jumped the chocks and ran into two CRJ200ER aircraft, N916EV and N975EV.

Nonfatal

All three aircraft sustained serious damage. None of the mechanics working in the hangar were injured.

21 July

Chicago, IL

American Eagle

Embraer ERJ-145

Reg: N672AE

And

Learjet 60

Reg. N252RP

The ERJ-145 was departing runway 32L and the Learjet 60 was landing runway 9R. The flight path for the arriving airplane passes over the flight path of the departing airplane from runway 32L. The ORD local assistant/monitor for the local controller observed the incident developing and instructed the local controller to send the LR60 around on runway 9R. The departing ERJ-145 on runway 32L was instructed by the local controller to stay low on its departure.

Nonfatal

At 2045 CDT, ORD facility management notified the FAA that according to ground radar (ASDE-X) analysis and radar replay, the LR60 passed 325 feet above and slightly behind the departing ERJ-145

22 July

Houston, TX

Continental Airlines-operated Boeing 737-700

Flight 458 was bound for Reagan National Airport, but was diverted and landed safely in New Orleans due to a sudden loss in cabin pressure.

Nonfatal

A flight carrying seven members of Congress from Houston to Washington was forced to make an emergency landing after it lost cabin pressure.  U.S. Rep. Ted Poe and seven other Texas Congressmen Nick Lampson, Ron Paul, John Carter, Ciro Rodriguez, Solomon Ortiz and Henry Cuellar were aboard the flight.  Ironically, the seven congressmen were trying to get back in time for a Tuesday night vote on an aviation safety bill. There were 118 people total aboard the plane. No one was hurt.

22 July

Ontario, Canada

Delta Air Lines 747

A westbound Delta Air Lines 737 passenger jet and a single-engine private plane on the way to Arizona had a close call in the skies near Ontario according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Nonfatal

Too close: Private plane, passenger jet pass less than a mile apart near Ontario

The Delta two-engine jet was on approach to Los Angeles International Airport at 11,900 feet when the four-seat private plane at 11,500 feet came within seventh-tenths of a mile.

23 July

Denver, CO

Air Canada  A319-114

Reg: C-FYJP

At approximately 2230 mountain daylight time, the airplane sustained minor damage when the right inboard tire failed during takeoff at Denver International Airport, Denver, Colorado.

Nonfatal

There were no injuries to the two cockpit crewmembers, three flight attendants, and 94 passengers. The flight was originating at the time of the incident. The captain detected a whistling noise as the airplane accelerated for takeoff and rejected the takeoff. The airplane was taxied back and a second takeoff was initiated. It was later determined that the landing gear was down and locked, and a flaps 3 landing was made on runway 16R. Inspection revealed the right inboard tire had failed. After discussions with the cabin crew and some passengers, indications were that the tire failed at rotation on the second takeoff. Rubber fragments were found on the right side of the runway at the 6,000-foot mark.

24 July

New Delhi, India

Air Mauritius Airbus 330-200

A suspected bird-hit at IGI airport at the time of takeoff led the pilot to apply emergency brakes. This sparked a fire in the underbelly, which was quickly controlled.

Nonfatal

The 241 passengers escaped by sliding down through three chutes during the emergency evacuation. Flight MK 745 was scheduled to take off from the secondary runway at 1.30pm but was delayed due to bird activity. It finally began taxiing around 2.08pm. Passengers on the flight confirmed to TOI that their pilot had announced an initial 10-minute delay due to “bird activity”.  Sources said the engine of the aircraft was damaged by the bird-hit; possibly two birds were sucked in by the engine.

25 July

Manila, PHIL

Qantas-operated Boeing 747-400

Reg: VH-OJK

The aircraft was operating a scheduled passenger service from Hong Kong to Melbourne, Australia. At approximately 29,000 feet, the crew were forced to conduct an emergency descent after a section of the fuselage separated and resulted in a rapid decompression of the cabin. The crew descended the aircraft to 10,000 feet in accordance with established procedures and diverted the aircraft to Manila where a safe landing was carried out. The aircraft taxied to the terminal unassisted, where the passengers and crew disembarked.

Nonfatal

Capt. John Bartels, at right, inspects damage after landing.

The airplane’s controls were unaffected  by the mishap, but some computer functions and electrics were affected – all three of the inertial reference systems (ILS) shut down, as did the captain’s flight management computer (probably because of the power outage caused by the explosive decompression, which interdicted wiring).

After leveling off, a fuel dump of 50 tons was completed, after which the airplane landed normally, using all available runway.

As a result of this incident, and a Qantas B767 emergency landing at Sydney on 2 August as a result of a hydraulic leak, the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) announced on 3 August a special investigation of the carrier, examining in greater depth issues such as maintenance, safety systems, and the way in which Qantas handled the recent incidents.

General Aviation and Helicopter

Date/

Location

Aircraft/Reg.

Narrative

Casualties

Comments

20 July

San Jose, CA

Extra Flugzeugproduktions-und EA 300/L

Reg: N981KM

About 1530 Pacific daylight time, an Extra Flugzeugproduktions-und EA 300/L collided on the ground with a Cessna TR182, N5146S, at Reid-Hillview Airport of Santa Clara County (RHV), San Jose, California. Both pilots were operating their airplanes under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91

Nonfatal

Both aircraft damaged

The private pilot in the Extra and the private pilot in the Cessna were not injured. The Extra sustained minor damage, and the Cessna sustained substantial damage to the tail section. Both flights had been on local area flights; the Cessna had departed at 1445, and the Extra had departed at 1450. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed for either flight.
The propeller of the Extra received minor damage, and the elevator, vertical stabilizer, and rudder of the Cessna were substantially damaged.

20 July

San Jose, CA

Cessna TR182 Reg: N5146S

See Above

Nonfatal

See Above

20 July

Lewistown, MT

Cessna 180

Reg: N1710C

During the initial part of his takeoff roll in a tail wheel-equipped airplane, the pilot lost directional control in variable and gusting wind conditions. During his attempt to regain control, the airplane’s wing struck the runway surface, resulting in bending damage to the main spar of the wing.

Nonfatal

At the time of the attempted takeoff, the winds were blowing at 15 to 25 knots, and were variable in direction.

20 July

Arlington, WA

LET Blanik L-13

Reg: N48029

Due to having extended his downwind leg too far, the pilot decided to land in a field short of the grass runway. He failed to maintain clearance from a nearby tree. After the wing of the glider hit the tree, it cart wheeled into the field, and sustained wrinkling and crushing damage to both its wings and fuselage.

Nonfatal

After a fifteen minute glider flight, the pilot entered the traffic pattern for a planned full-stop landing on a grass airstrip that ran adjacent to the active paved runway. He then extended his downwind leg in order to create a greater clearance between himself and a powered airplane that was landing on the paved runway. After rolling out on base leg, the pilot realized that he had extended his downwind leg too far to reach the grass strip under the current gusting wind conditions.

21 July

Salt Lake City, UT

Beech A200

Reg: N11

On July 21, 2008, about 1430 mountain daylight time, the airplane had a landing gear malfunction resulting in a gear-up landing at Salt Lake City International Airport (SLC), Salt Lake City, Utah. The Federal Aviation Administration was operating the public-use airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91.

Nonfatal

Damaged airplane

The two airline transport pilots were uninjured; the airplane sustained substantial damage to the lower fuselage. The local instructional flight departed SLC about 1415. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.  The Cockpit Voice Recorder (CVR) and the Flight Data Recorder (FDR) were recovered and sent to the National Transportation Safety Board Vehicle Recorder Laboratory, Washington, DC, for download and review.

During the examination of the airplane it was discovered that the 60-amp thermal circuit breaker for the landing gear motor had tripped. The landing gear motor and landing gear transmission were recovered for further examination.

21 July

Newark, IL

Czech Aircraft Works Sport Cruiser

Reg: N602CF

On July 21, 2008, about 1030 central daylight time, the airplane impacted terrain near Cushing Field (0C8), Newark, Illinois.

1 Fatality

Airplane substantially damaged

The sport pilot received fatal injuries. The airplane was registered as a Special – Light Sport Aircraft (S-LSA), and was operated as a rental airplane by Sport Pilot Chicago. The 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight departed 08C about 1030 on a local flight. There were no witnesses to the accident. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed.

22 July

Rome, GA

Maule MT-7-235

Aircraft flipped during landing after it hit a pothole on the grass runway.  Aircraft was operated by Civil Air Patrol

Nonfatal

The plane had been used to take a glider up and had landed on the grass strip before overturning. According to Civil Air Patrol officials, the front landing wheel of the plane apparently hit a hole or small depression on the landing strip, causing it to flip on its back.

22 July

Iliamna, AK

de Havilland DHC-3

Reg: N61FE

On July 22, 2008, about 1330 Alaska daylight time, a float-equipped, de Havilland DHC-3 Otter airplane, N61FE, sustained substantial damage when it struck a tree while landing on a road, following an emergency descent, about 4 miles north of Iliamna, Alaska. The airplane was being operated by Rainbow King Lodge Inc., Iliamna, as a visual flight rules (VFR) local flight, in conjunction with its guiding business. The solo commercial pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed.

Nonfatal

Airplane substantially damaged

During a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) on July 23, the pilot said he was scouting local lakes and rivers for fish. He said while returning to a pond near the lodge, the airplane’s engine lost oil pressure and quit. The pilot said he descended to a road, and after touching the floats on the road, the left wing struck a tree, causing the airplane to depart the roadway. He said the airplane sustained damage to the wing’s leading edge, and believed the wing might be bent aft. After examination by the pilot and an aviation mechanic, the pilot said the number eight cylinder had separated from the engine, pulling off an oil line. He said the engine had 19 hours since overhaul.

23 July 2008

Longmont, CO

Beech 35-C33A

Reg: N7965M

At 1008 mountain daylight time, the airplane was substantially damaged when the engine lost power and the airplane landed short of runway 29 at Vance Brand Municipal Airport (2V2), Longmont, Colorado.

Nonfatal

Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The personal flight was being conducted under the Part 91, and a visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan had been filed. There were no injuries to the pilot and his passenger. The cross-country flight originated from Wendover (ENV), Nevada, approximately 0800.
According to the pilot, he was on final approach to runway 29. When he tried to adjust the power setting, the engine did not respond. He made a forced landing on uneven terrain short of the runway.

23 July 2008

Midlothian, TX

Schempp-Hirth Ventus A

Reg: N47JD

At about 1240 Central Daylight Time (CDT), a Schepp-Hirth Ventus-A glider departed controlled flight and subsequently impacted terrain.

1 Fatality

Glider destroyed

The commercial pilot was fatally injured. The personal flight was being conducted under Part 91 without a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight originated at TSA Gliderport, Midlothian, Texas (TA11). Examination of the glider revealed major portions of both wings and the empennage were separated from the fuselage by impact with trees and terrain.

24 July

Shelton, WA

Cessna A185F Reg: N6320N

At about 1515 Pacific daylight time, a float equipped Cessna collided with terrain after takeoff from Lake Nahwatzel near Shelton, Washington.

2 Fatalities

Airplane destroyed

The owner was operating the airplane under Part 91. The certificated private pilot and passenger were killed; a post crash fire destroyed the airplane. The cross-country personal flight had a planned destination of Auburn, Washington. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

Military

Date

Aircraft Type

Narrative

Casualties

Comments

21 July

GUAM

U.S. Air Force B-52H Stratofortress

The unarmed B-52 bomber was en route from Guam’s Andersen Air Force Base to conduct a flyover in a parade on another part of the island when it crashed around 9:45 a.m. Monday about 30 miles northwest of Apra Harbor, the Air Force said.

6 Fatal

A bomber was scheduled to fly over crowds celebrating Liberation Day, which commemorates the U.S. capture of Guam from Japan in 1944, but it was unclear in the days immediately after the accident whether the plane that crashed was the one that had been scheduled to perform the flyover.

23 July

Estancia Esperanza, BOLIVIA

Fokker F-27-400M Friendship

Reg: FAB-92

The F-27 took off from Guayaramerin (GYA) at 11:56 on a domestic flight to Trinidad (TDD), where it was expected to arrive around 13:30. At 12:20 the crew radioed they experienced problems with the number1 engine.

Nonfatal

A forced landing was carried out on a road, causing substantial damage to the aircraft.

All entries are preliminary and subject to confirmation/correction by formal accident reports.


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